Depending on how you choose to use them, some or all of the pre-screening processes for hiring people with disabilities may be handled by your agency.

But, in general, your screening process should focus on three broad categories:

 

1. Consideration of the requirements of the job

  • Identify the environment the hire would need to function in, and the needs thereof.
  • Identify the integral, core responsibilities of the role. These are the major responsibilities for which this role principally exists.
  • Identify secondary, non-integral responsibilities of the role. These are lesser responsibilities which would generally be attached to this position, but which could potentially be allocated to a different employee.
  • Identify peripheral, non-integral responsibilities of the role. These are general workplace responsibilities which may be allocated to a wide range of employees.

 

2. Physical and cognitive ability of the candidates to perform specific functions after accommodations 

  • Identify whether or not a candidate has the ability to perform all core responsibilities.
  • Identify whether or not a candidate has the ability to perform a sufficient number of secondary responsibilities that the remainder of work may be allocated elsewhere.
  • General, peripheral, non-integral responsibilities of the role should not be considered in screening or hiring considerations.

 

3. Social and communication requirements for the position after accommodations 

  • Identify whether or not a candidate has the ability to perform all core responsibilities.
  • Identify whether or not a candidate has the ability to perform a sufficient number of secondary responsibilities that the remainder of work may be allocated elsewhere.
  • General, peripheral, non-integral responsibilities of the role should not be considered in screening or hiring considerations.

 

Always note all position requirements on a case by case basis. The realities of a company workplace in one location may differ from the workplace in another company location, changing the needs of the environment and the scope of what responsibilities are integral or non-integral for the specific position you are hiring for. 

Before you begin your hiring efforts, however, it’s a smart idea to review your application and interview process in order to better understand where people with disabilities might be getting lost in the system, and to make any adjustments that are warranted. (You can find best practices for accessibility in applicant tracking systems and pre-hire tests at AskJAN.)

 

Things to consider:

  • Is your online application process accessible, and can people with disabilities easily access it?
  • How are you integrating any partner agencies into your application and interview process? What’s their feedback about your application and interview process?
  • Have the employees who manage this process at your site had access to disability awareness and etiquette training, and do they understand your program’s goals?
  • Do applicants have the opportunity to self-identify as an individual with a disability at every step of the application and interview process?
  • Do applicants have the ability to easily request accommodations at every step of the application and interview process?

 

By following these screening and hiring practices, you will be able to effectively match the right applicants to the right roles at your company and ensure equitable access to the application process for people with disabilities.

And once you have hired a new employee, it’s important to a foster a long and productive relationship through effective onboarding and training.

 

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